Comments

  • March 6, 2012

    Leslie, I am so excited about where your life is taking you.  Such a scary and unknown world, but more massive than you could have ever dreamed!  I know that through the challenges of this new venture, your family will grow stronger.  And YES, your kids are going to have experiences in these times that they will cherish.  Thinking of you as you transition to figuring out part time life across an ocean, but confident that if anyone can make this work, its YOU!

  • Marie
    March 6, 2012

    Did you move to Europe, Leslie?  My sister lived in that part of Germany for a few years. It’s beautiful!

  • March 6, 2012

    You are in Nuremberg for weeks? Surely this time we have to manage to meet up!! I’m there this weekend, but full of family crap and you’ll be full of jetlag, I imagine, but maybe sometime in the coming weeks? Munich is only just down the road, obv. 

  • Sydney Cole
    March 7, 2012

    Wow. Wowee wow wow. You are so inspiring, smart and thoughtful. I’m so proud of you. If you ever need to vent, I’m über available (is that German, über? I only know one, well technically two, words n German but they’re not appropriate for a family blog). Love you so, xoxo -syd

  • Yo' daddy
    March 7, 2012

    Actually, in that part of Germany, you’d say “GrussGott.”

  • March 7, 2012

    Ah, instead of GutenAben, right. GrüßGott is more common, but I did hear a lot of people saying gutenaben. 

  • March 7, 2012

    YES! I plan on coming to München to visit Betty and you! 

  • March 7, 2012

    No, I’m working for a company in Erlangen, though, outside of Nürnberg. I’ll be staying there and more than likely coming back to visit again. Hopefully frequently. smile

  • March 7, 2012

    HAHA. über. Love you, lady. You always make my day. xo

  • March 7, 2012

    And dad, you should come visit. Seriously.

  • Yo' daddy
    March 8, 2012

    Ha!

    Looks like you’re learning how German is really spoken there.  Tecnically, it’s “Guten Abend.”  But the people around there drop letters when it’s spoken and many grammer rules are just ignored.  The “der, die, das,” etc. definite articles are often spoken as just “duh.”  So instead of saying “Der Mann,” what you’ll swear they say is “Duh Mann.”  They know the grammer rules, mind you, they just don’t always use them.

    If you want REAL Hochdeutsch, go to Austria.  They speak textbook German almost everywhere.  After a couple of years in Bayreuth, when we went to Austria it was like hearing English.  The German was so pure and precise, it was very easy to understand.

    By the way.  Try to go to Bayreuth while you’re there.  It’s just up the Autobahn about an hour and a lovely place.  Your in-utero home.  grin

  • Yo' daddy, again
    March 8, 2012

    Oh, and another common one is dropping the “e” at the end of the first person singular verb conjugation.  So instead of “Ich gehe nach hause,” they’ll say “Ich geh nach hause.”  Other parts of Germany recognize the accent one gets when living around there.  Kinda like when I say “y’all.”

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